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[Podcast] Outsourced CFO, Accounting, and Finance Best Practices with Robin Thieme of KBS CFO

Topic: Podcast

In this episode of the AI in Accounting Podcast, you will meet Robin Thieme, the CEO and Founder of KBS CFO, based in Kensington, Maryland, just north of Washington, DC. Founded in 2004, KBS CFO provides strategic CFO services, accounting, and business-process restructuring.

Robin has some great advice for those who are just starting up their own CAS practice, including how and why you should pick a niche:

[Podcast] Outsourced CFO, Accounting, and Finance Best Practices with Robin Thieme of KBS CFO

“Pick a few industries that you really care about and have an interest in to focus on because being a generalist [makes it] harder for people to consider hiring you than when you can say you understand the way a distillery operates, or you understand government contracting.”

Robin also has a wealth of advice for those who have been in the CAS sphere for a while and are starting to hit a wall. She suggests keeping up with technology to avoid becoming stagnant in an ever-changing world:

“I use the [title] ‘Transaction Specialist’ in our company, and those transaction specialists need to learn both how to capture transactions the old-fashioned way, but also how to supervise bots and supervise the technology that’s occurring, and so there’s going to be a bigger, growing demand for people to be able to watch what’s happening [and ask] ‘How do you redirect? How do you leverage that?’”

Robin also suggests incorporating icebreakers into your weekly meetings to help improve team morale:

“I make sure we commit to certain routines that I think help. One of the routines is … meeting every week with your team. … We start the meeting out with something that usually has a personal and a professional component. So, one day, I might start a meeting and say, ‘Share with me a fond memory you have of a grandparent, and then what was your proudest achievement last week?’ So, that might be an icebreaker to delve into what’s going on in people’s lives and trying to maintain those connections. … I think that’s really important for people to take a moment to think about their accomplishments.”

Listen to the episode in full to learn more about the importance of:

  • Finding your confidence as an outsourced CFO,
  • Building a specialized practice according to niche, industry, vertical, and market,
  • Having strong, trusted advisors that you can lean on in good times and bad,
  • Knowing when it’s time to pivot, and how to do so,
  • Developing and maintaining client relationships by learning to over communicate, and
  • Thinking of yourself as a “Chief Anticipation Officer” by keeping a pulse on what’s on the horizon.

All this and more is discussed in detail in this episode of the AI in Accounting Podcast. To learn more about Robin Thieme and contact her with any questions about CFO services and CAS, you can check out her LinkedIn profile and visit her bio page.

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A lightly-edited transcript follows below:

Robin Thieme:

The expectation of our clients, again, they're usually leading us along in terms of the accounting industry. There's this expectation that the cost of accumulating transactions is next to nothing. Everything’s automated, and everything is instantaneous. That's not actually where we are today, but that's what our clients are expecting from us. 

Announcer:

Welcome to the AI in Accounting podcast, which helps accounting, bookkeeping, and finance professionals prepare for the future of outsourced accounting and accounting technology. Plus, you'll learn how to use artificial intelligence (AI), automation, and machine learning to scale your accounting practice. Now, here's your host, Joshua Feinberg of vic.ai.

Joshua Feinberg:

Hi, it's Joshua Feinberg from the AI in Accounting podcast, and I have with me today a very special guest. I'm joined today by Robin Thieme from KBS CFO. Robin is CEO and Founder of KBS CFO, based in Kensington, Maryland, just north of Washington, DC. Robin, welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining me today.

Robin Thieme:

Glad to be here, Josh. Thanks for having me. It's a good thing to do on a Friday afternoon.

Joshua Feinberg:

Excellent, excellent. That's great. Yeah, I actually find a lot of our listeners have all different times; some listen at their desk during their routine; some listen in the evening, while they're folding laundry or vacuuming. Some turn it on at the gym or while they're out running. There's a lot of great ways to consume podcasts and continuing education.

Robin Thieme:

There is. It's great. Who would have thought? It's so wonderful. I'm more of a walk-and-listen.

Journey to Outsourced CFO and Outsourced Accounting

Joshua Feinberg:

The first place I wanted to start was I noticed that you have about 30 years of experience in the industry, and I wanted to understand how KBS CFO came to be. Was that your original plan? Did you always want to be an accountant? Did you go to school for accounting? 

Robin Thieme:

Yeah, I did go to school for accounting. I didn't know what it was called, but I always had an interest in how things work, and the mechanics of how things work from a very young age, and then also our future, just future technology. So, I'm dating myself a little bit, but I loved the “Jetsons”, as an example, which is a cartoon that some of your listeners know, and some don't, but I love thinking about gadgetry, and the future of that and combining that with—again, this is not exactly how other people might frame accounting—but I was thinking of the oil that runs through the business, the engine, the mechanics of the business. I grew up in a town where we knew the different shop owners, and we knew the different people. I was just always curious about how it worked, how they stuck around, how it was going for them, what their challenges were. So, a pretty young age, and then when I started to learn about what accounting was, that was clear to me, that was putting a degree to the things that I found interesting. So, again, the things that I found interesting, I think some accountants, that's not what they would describe. They like the ticking and flicking, or there's other mechanical elements of accounting that other people are attracted to, but I was really always attracted to how it supported businesses' functioning.

Joshua Feinberg:

So, the “Jetsons”, flying cars, autonomous accounting; are we getting there? 

Robin Thieme:

I think so. Autonomous cars. I need to watch that show again, but it's cool to think about, but between that, and a couple of the other futuristic shows that people watch; “Star Trek” had the little gadget that people would tap on their shoulder to talk to people. I don't know if you ever watched “Star Trek”. So, some of these things that people were just picturing, and then as a little kid, with a friend, we would create future houses and try to think about what buttons we could push, and what things they would do. It's cool to see some of those things happening but unfortunately, I have no stock in all these gadgetries, but I find them fascinating.

Joshua Feinberg:

So, who knew Zoom? 

Robin Thieme:

Oh, my goodness. If we had only known.

Joshua Feinberg:

Yeah. What did they say? There's been five or 10 years of digital transformation in the last eight or nine months. Pace of change.

Robin Thieme:

Yeah, all the things that you were going to bet on; I guess there's Zoom, of course, that's taken off and has become a noun, and a verb that didn't exist, and then I've just been fascinated by the number of propane tanks that we're all going through. There's not one propane tank company. There might be a stock under there that's benefiting greatly from everybody trying to eat outdoors, all these restaurants and staying warm, social distance outside, and things like that. 

Joshua Feinberg:

Yes. It's a been a lot of changes. I had never ordered online groceries, and yet we have not been in the supermarket since early March. 

Robin Thieme:

Yeah. It's great technology. I know. I've taken advantage of that a little bit myself. I basically was always interested in accounting. I guess you asked me about KBS CFO, and I worked in public accounting for many years, and then I did always know that I was building a foundation. I always wanted to own my own business. It was really something; it was very clear to me. I didn't know how hard it would be, but it sounded good. I went from public accounting, and, as I was trying to build my knowledge, I also acted as first a controller, and then a CFO at a variety of businesses, and then in 2004, I realized that where we were with technology—even at that point—that the fractional CFO was going to be something that I could do with the technology that we had at that time. I was able to acquire a few clients. It was a little bit harder to explain to them at that point what we do. It's a lot easier nowadays, but to answer your question, I moved off of the topic. Once we started talking about “Jetsons”, I got distracted.

Joshua Feinberg:

It's interesting that so many people that I know that have outsourced CFO businesses and do outsourced accounting and client accounting, their positioning, this concept of an “outsourced CFO” and “fractional CMO”, and it seems to almost always be with small businesses, and small businesses in many cases are used to also outsourcing technology, to an outsourced CTO, or a CIO with their managed service provider or marketing to an outsourced CMO site. I think a lot of small businesses are warming up to this idea, and what I've heard from a lot of others in similar roles over the last several months is the pandemic is really just accelerating the realization that when there weren't great systems around internally in the past, that there's just so much more value to outsourcing and focusing on the core business, until a company's truly at the size where they can hire someone in a more senior role. 

Robin Thieme:

Yeah, and there's a couple things going on. Definitely, of course, everything was accelerated by the pandemic. I think the recognition that both the virtual and fractional CFO could help with all the challenges that occurred in 2020. So, it definitely played a role, and the whole concept of “non-employers”, people that choose to have a business and don't want to have any employees. It could be generational, but it has happened; there's been an explosion in that prior to COVID, even. Now, the small business administration, and different statistics, you can look up the growth in non-employers. I had one client that had every key division outfitted with outsourced solution providers. Be it the IT—as you said, the finance—and was a pretty good-sized business. I think that's just only touched the surface on that. I think that one of the expressions that I come back to, that the business owners today recognize that they are smaller than a big business, obviously, but they still have complex issues. So, it's like that expression, if you have a young child, somebody might say you have “small children, small problems”—which the parents of a small child would maybe throw something at you if you said that because that's not how it feels to them—but for sure, in terms of small businesses, the problems that they encounter are complex and challenging and relevant. So, having access to the different levels of the finance and the IT is critical to sustaining today. I think there's some recognition that some of the people that are not making it through this pandemic might not have had access to some people that would have been able to help them, unfortunately. That's been my observation. 

Joshua Feinberg:

Some of it's the business model, and you're right; having strong, trusted advisors that you can lean on in good times and in tough times can make a huge difference to giving an entrepreneur the confidence to keep moving forward and knowing when it's time to pivot, and if they're going to pivot, how to pivot. 

Robin Thieme:

So, we have a portfolio of businesses; some of them, we provide the classic CFO role at any accounting department, and others just honestly have really always relied on us to just do the bare minimum, but this pandemic resulted in some businesses really seeing value where they never needed it or understood it, actually. So, there's been, I think, just a big change in terms of people appreciating their accountants a lot more right now. 

Advice for Getting Started as an Outsourced CFO

Joshua Feinberg:

Absolutely. There's so many people that associate taxes with getting a root canal that it's great for the accountants to get some recognition for their vital role in keeping businesses going. I wanted to get your take for the advice that you'd offer to someone who you've maybe met at a conference—when we used to go to more offline conferences—or maybe someone you know from the community that was thinking of starting up an outsourced CFO practice in another region, another part of the country, and they're wondering, what should they expect? What's the single-most important area of building that practice up successfully that they really need to concentrate on in the first few years? 

Robin Thieme:

First of all, I teach a course for the American Institute of CPAs. It's not a commercial for it, but I can't help but think about it because actually, the topic is “Success Being a Virtual CFO”. So, in the class, I really encourage people to not venture into the CFO part of it, until they really make sure that they have a lot of the hard and soft skills. So, for your example, there's two personas; we'll pick on two. One persona—let's just say that they had worked in operations and in a company and also ideally had some great mentors. So, they understand the engine of accounting, and so for those people, there's so much demand that I encourage them to come on along and join me in this journey. I would say that it really does help to pick a few industries. This is not novel. I'm sure some of the other guests have said the same thing, but I would reinforce it. Pick a few industries that you really care about and have an interest in to focus on because being a generalist, it's actually harder for people to consider hiring you than when you can say you understand the way a distillery operates, or you understand government contracting. So, that's for that persona, and then for the other persona—and I just actually was walking with a friend, and they were mentoring a young man who was 25, and he really likes the idea of being an outsourced CFO—I guess I would encourage that persona to see if they could work for a company that has a good framework in place and could really be a great place to learn all that there is because it's a big responsibility, and organizations are counting on us to walk in with some knowledge and experience, and it's not something one should do without having that or say that they can do without really having built up some knowledge and experience.

Joshua Feinberg:

I've actually noticed a pattern among a lot of these interviews, as well, where there's a certain kind of persona that starts with 70, 80-hour weeks in public accounting, when they're right out of school. They, at some point, say, “Enough is enough”; they actually want to sleep, have weekends, engaged, married, family, whatever it is, and they slow down to a more normal 60-hour week, and they go work in private industry as a controller, as a CFO, accounting manager, what-have-you, in a more generalist role, in a couple of different industries, and then what I've noticed in some of these traditional CPA firms is some time in their 40s or 50s, they show back up at a public accounting firm, leading a CAS group, and they're in beast-mode now because they went out, and they started in public accounting; they went out, and they walked in the shoes of the kind of entrepreneurs that they want to help, and they come back, and—wow! They're a powerhouse with nonprofits, or manufacturing companies, or whatever it is.

Robin Thieme:

I've witnessed that, too; that is a perfect journey for somebody; that pathway is going to lead to great successes. As I said, this is the fastest-growing portion of the CPA industry, and there's just a huge demand, and a recognition of demand. Business owners are pretty sophisticated, and they, at times, know, at times, accountants need to follow the lead of the business owners, and this is what they want. I think that persona that you described is big in-demand. I think it's that the practices that are being developed at these firms, some of them are really doing a fantastic job. I've met a number of them at different conferences before COVID, and so forth, and some—just connected to your question—some just can't get the consultant out of their heads. So, they're just never able to embrace working with clients in this capacity; it’s a “we” relationship, where “We're a part of the team; I'm not independent; I'm rooting for their financial success.” Some of my colleagues really embrace that, and others really are challenged by that mindset-change that you have to have when you provide the virtual CFO service. You're really trying to think through the whole organization. I was on a call with somebody else, actually, earlier today, and so you want to be thinking through the whole organization—and really, at times, be thinking about what's happening with your client—that goes beyond just reconciling a prepaid expense. That's not going to work. They don't care about that. So, they only care about it as it relates to where does that figure fit into their story? That's part of the importance of this role, as well. 

Advice for Growing an Outsourced CFO Practice

Joshua Feinberg:

So, that's great advice for someone that's just getting started to make sure that they actually feel comfortable being in that role of an outsourced CFO, that they get the right experience specializing by niche, industry, vertical, market, and perhaps going to work for someone else on their outsourced CFO practice before they build one of their own. What advice would you give to someone that's had a successful outsourced CFO practice, and it just doesn't seem to be going really well right now? It was a super challenging year; maybe they were heavily concentrated in certain industries that got really battered, and they're feeling a sense of burnout, and they've come to you and said, "Robin, this just doesn't seem to be working. What should I do next? What should I do to recharge the batteries?" 

Robin Thieme:

I think a lot of people are feeling like that in all kinds of businesses, actually, right now, and actually, I definitely have had my moments of challenge. I don't know if I'm the best person, but as a colleague, I would say that being comfortable really listening to others that are around you and being open to revisiting things. Clearly, if you're hitting a wall, there's something that needs to change. I know just a lot of people are struggling with hiring the right people. I've hired the wrong people. I know, a lot of times you ask your guests about different challenges and just jumping the gun a little bit because of the question you asked. I know that's really challenging to hire people. I have developed a hiring practice that honestly, I was really proud of, and I still will continue to use it. It's not novel now. It was novel when I started, where you were doing working interviews. Nowadays, the processes baked into a lot of companies' hiring practices, but if that's not working—which, at times, it didn't work for me, as just the sole method for hiring, just doing these working interviews—I went back to the team, and I said—similar to the scenario that you described to me, Joshua—“What's working? What's not?” Listening to the team members, team members were like, "Let's do some joint interviews; let's have a team of three or four people interview somebody before they come in the door," and just being open to, "Well, okay, I can think of all the reasons not to do that but maybe I should start to think of the reasons why to do it." So, really, I think trying to take a moment to rethink why you're doing something and being open and having the courage to experiment a little bit with the hopes that, at times, those experiments are going to work, and sometimes they won't work, but you'll be the better for learning and more likely to break free of that wall that you might have hit. 

Joshua Feinberg:

Did you find that having your team being remote in the past prepared you better for the challenges that we've been through over the last six months to a year? Or has it still been just an extraordinarily difficult learning curve, with what everyone else is going through in their personal lives and families?

Robin Thieme:

Yeah, I guess that's a pretty loaded question. Definitely, we've been virtual since inception in 2004, but that doesn't mean that we have it all figured out. It's always a challenge. I would say, when everything shut down, and one of my employees was so excited because she was like, "This seems really hard for everybody else, but it's just another day at work for us." So, she was proud of the fact that we've been virtual all this time but managing people in a virtual environment is challenging. There's no question and developing client relationships and maintaining them is challenging. You have to learn to overcommunicate. It's hard when people are remote to see—as you said, in COVID—is one of your workers concerned about their child, who's having trouble with the online learning? That's a super common issue that many employers and families dealt with this year, that you could feel the stress throughout the year. For the remote part of this, I make sure we commit to certain routines that I think help. One of the routines—again, this isn't novel, but I think it works—is just make sure you're meeting every week with your team, and that you have a meeting that has some genuine attributes, genuine connections within the meeting. So, we have a 90-minute meeting every Wednesday. We start the meeting out with something that usually has a personal and a professional component. So, one day, I might start a meeting and say, "Share with me a fond memory you have of a grandparent, and then what was your proudest achievement last week?" So, that might be an icebreaker to delve into what's going on in people's lives and trying to maintain those connections. We have another tool that we use that I have people regularly checking in with me through Slack; we use Slack, and the check-in includes: “What are your priorities? What did you accomplish?” I think that's really important for people to take a moment to think about their accomplishments, and “How are you feeling about your capacity?” So, just having exchanges with people. We've been doing those things for years. It did seem like it was even more important this year than ever to refine and commit to those practices.

The Future of Outsourced CFO Practices

Joshua Feinberg:

Yup, that's super helpful, and it's great advice. I'm always curious about—for the firms that were way ahead of the curve on cloud and way ahead of the curve on remote—what they've found has been really helpful for the last year. I'm sure a lot of our viewers and listeners will really appreciate that—the check-ins, and the questions. The final area I wanted to ask you about today, Robin, was to get your thoughts on where the future of being an outsourced CFO is headed as a business. What do you think is going on right now, where we're going to look back 24 months from now and say, “This was the one big thing that changed everything, and it led to a completely different direction for what the business of being an outsourced CFO was all about?” 

Robin Thieme:

I think about that a lot because overall, one of my branding descriptors of me is a “Chief Anticipation Officer”. I try; I really do, actually. What I'm better at anticipating is—under the current scenario—“What challenges is a company going to encounter?” Which wasn't your question, but I'm just saying, I'm very focused on anticipating that. I'm definitely challenged by thinking through what's on the horizon, but I'd like to really keep a pulse on it. I think that the non-employer model is going to continue to grow, and I think it's going to be really interesting to see how the unemployment systems, and the different infrastructure that's very employer-based, is going to adapt to the ability for more and more individuals to be able to function and do that, and how the tax laws will adjust, and so forth. I think there's something interesting going on there. I definitely think in terms of technology, we need to develop skills centered around being able to understand what's happening within technological software that we use, as opposed to recreate it. I know with vic.ai—and this isn't a commercial; it's really relevant to the question—when I've been interviewing some people that I call the “accounting clerks”, or “bookkeepers”, those terms, I use the word “Transaction Specialist” in our company, and those transaction specialists need to learn both how to capture transactions the old-fashioned way, but also how to supervise bots and supervise the technology that's occurring, and so there's going to be a bigger, growing demand for people to be able to watch what's happening, not understand all the underlying coding—or even the underlying methods for what happened that was presented to you—but more, “How do you redirect? How do you leverage that type of thing?” So, those are some random thoughts related to where I see things going, and, of course, the expectation of our clients—again, they're usually leading us along in terms of the accounting industry. There's this expectation that the cost of accumulating transactions is next-to-nothing. Basically, that everything's automated, and everything is instantaneous. That's not actually where we are today, but that's what our clients are expecting from us. So, they're expecting us to be having these outsourced solution providers, where we're spending more time predicting, describing, telling the stories, and less time saying, "What was that $103.42 that you spent that I can't understand the description?" They don't want to hear that from an accounting professional. They think that robots are going to be able to handle that. I think that's a really important part of what's going to happen down the road, and we need to adapt to be able to meet those needs and work with the systems that are going to be put in front of us. So, those are just a couple ideas. It's something I think about quite a bit. I think it's challenging to parse out what innovations to hang onto and hang your hat onto and invest in, and which ones lead you down a road of waste and aren't going to actually get you anywhere. It's going to be challenging to figure that out.

Joshua Feinberg:

Yeah, that's a great point, starting with the idea of being the “Chief Anticipation Officer” for your clients’ financial problems, but I find that because so much of what I talk about with people on the podcasts and the webinars is very entrepreneurial in nature, and it's extremely unusual for someone in a professional services business to have a product manager. That's something that technology companies and software companies have, but there are times where you need to sit down and listen to the needs of clients and figure out what are the unfulfilled needs that you can deliver and build a service as a profitable service. That's also a really interesting point, too, on hiring for talent that knows enough about how the technology works to understand if it's working effectively or if it's malfunctioning. I was moderating a workshop I think about a year-and-a-half ago, and someone brought up this point of hiring right out of school and making sure that the entry-level staff knew enough to be able to figure out instinctively, “Is this right or wrong?” It's very similar to the analogy of someone that's working at a fast-casual restaurant or in retail, and the point-of-sale system malfunctions, and would they know how to give proper change when someone hands them a $20 bill? What it actually is, and is it normal or is it not?

Robin Thieme:

Yeah, yeah. I still remember—this is a long time ago—but when I was doing tax forecasts, and I was working at a CPA firm, and I was always attracted to the technology. I went to this newfangled tax-forecast tool, and I prepared it for a client, and then he said, "This is fine." He took the results and basically, you could tell he ignored it. He's like, "Now, go back and figure it out by hand," which is not something that I wanted. I'm not going to do that, necessarily. I don't want to reproduce what's happening in technology by hand, but his point was that I did not understand. I was just pushing buttons, and that is the last thing that our clients want from us is that we're just pushing buttons. Just related to that, I don't know where this is going to go, maybe you know, or maybe we'll both see, but there's a lot of accountants that are just superior at Excel, and they could spend all their days knocking out really beautiful, amazing Excel spreadsheets. I just don't know if that's going to be what we should be doing and valued by our clients in the end. If we can find a good cash-forecast system that does what we need to do, and we can spend more time talking about what's happening, and less time watching our Excel spreadsheets break, that seems like that needs to be what's expected of us, I guess. So, that seems like a change that needs to happen. 

Joshua Feinberg:

Yeah, the general sentiment that I seem to be seeing across the board is everyone wants to be using technology to be able to reallocate their client's budget, so they can actually really be the outsourced CFO, or the trusted business advisor that they promise them on the website that they were actually going to do. I think there's a lot of CAS leaders, and outsourced accounting firms, and small firms, all different-sized firms that work with entrepreneurs that are figuring out pretty rapidly what's the best way for them to add value to their clients, as opposed to just being in the compliance and coding and data entry business because the feeds are going to make that all obsolete. 

Robin Thieme:

That's right. I guess I use the term that there's two distinct pathways. One is a race to the bottom, and the other one is a race towards the top of the value chain. The bottom isn't necessarily bad because it's pretty cool, some of the automation that's happening, but there's bookkeeping firms out there—I actually partner with a few—that you can have bookkeeping done for less than their utility bill, and they do a really great job. I'm not competing with that. I'm very glad that they figured all those proprietary things out, and that's only going to help us. There's some people that want to fight that. I'm trying to be in the other pathway, the other race, but it is challenging, I think, to get there, and not everything works perfectly, and, at times, you know that's where you want to be, but you're stuck doing some kind of transactional activity because you can't find a tool that will work the way you need it to do what you would like. So, it's a mixed bag but definitely, I think that's the vision for the industry. I guess some people have changed the name a little bit. So, it's C-A-S-S, I don't know if you've seen that.

Joshua Feinberg:

I have seen there's about a dozen different synonyms going around. Then over the last 6-12 months, I've noticed a lot are adding an extra A into the acronym, the client accounting and advisory service, which is really interesting.

Robin Thieme:

Advisory and accounting.

Joshua Feinberg:

Client accounting and advisory services, yeah. What's interesting about that, too, is so many small businesses are used to SaaS—software-as-a-service—and all these “as-a-service” business. In reality, you actually have them “as-a-service” in there, but the acronym is completely different. It's all branding and positioning. A lot of firms want to have their proprietary twist on it but at the end of the day, it's about providing more value to clients and moving up the value chain to be able to have a healthier business. 

Robin Thieme:

I think that the SaaS makes more sense to the business purchaser. So, it is a funny thing that accountants are saying this. I think a lot of business owners are like, "I don't even know what that means."

Joshua Feinberg:

CAS, and CAAS with the extra A. 

Robin Thieme:

But they do know what SaaS—software-as-a-service—means, for sure. So, one company using FaaS—which is, I think, financial-as-a-service—that means something to a lot of business owners. 

Joshua Feinberg:

It's just the nature of the business model, but this has been super helpful, Robin. I really appreciate you taking the time to join me today on the podcast. For someone that's curious to learn more about KBS CFO to learn more about you, are you active on LinkedIn? Where's a good place where you'd send someone that wants to learn more or maybe connect with you?

Robin Thieme:

Yeah. Thanks, Josh. So, the best way is either to go to the website—kbscfo.com—or LinkedIn; I'm definitely active. I love hearing from other colleagues, and for sure, I get notes from people that are looking to break into this virtual CFO industry. I welcome hearing from any of your guests, and for those CPAs that are interested, there's a bunch of really great programs out there. I have a course that I'm proud of, and about 1000 people have taken it, but there's also a CAS badge you can get from cpa.com. It's a great experience, and a bunch of other resources out there to help build your outsourced CFO educational background. I encourage some of that continuing ed. 

Joshua Feinberg:

That's awesome. Thanks again, Robin, for joining me today. It's been super helpful. I wish you all the best in continuing to provide great service and great value to your small business clients, and distilleries, and beyond, and I look forward to hearing great things coming from your practice going forward. 

Robin Thieme:

Thanks a lot, Josh; it's nice meeting you. I look forward to another conversation in two years. We'll see what came true, and what didn't.

Joshua Feinberg:

Awesome. That's great.

Robin Thieme:

How's that?

Joshua Feinberg:

It sounds like a great idea. Thanks, Robin. 

 

What's your favorite outsourced accounting tip? And what did you find most valuable from this podcast interview with Robin Thieme? Let us know in the Comments section below.

Learn even more about client accounting services (CAS) when you download the free report: The State of Client Accounting Services and Outsourced Accounting.

 

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